Looks Bad on Paper

Years ago, about ten rows back in the auditorium a tearful mom talked to me after a school presentation on the dangers of alcohol and other drugs. “I don’t do anything that matters,” she said. “I’m so consumed with my son’s drug problem.” I could relate to the moon and back having felt that way to be sure. It gave new perspective to hear her say it out loud. What she does matters — she loves someone.

Read more

She let go.

I heard it was good, so upon request my friend, Carol, sent to me a talk she gave at a group event. I think I’ve shared this piece on letting go but some things need to be our home screen and for me, this is one of them.

Read more

Keep Going

There’s a lot going on these days, isn’t there? People want each other to behave the way they want them to behave. They are yelling on Facebook with exclamation points. I commented on a post, which I intended to be a benign, peace-keeping neutral call to non-partisanship on the opioid crisis. A woman responded, “ARE YOU SERIOUS?!!!!”  I simply replied, “Yes.”  As is said, You don’t have to attend every argument to which you’re invited. 

Read more

Chocoholic

At a listening session on the teenage brain and drug use, Dr. Ken Winters started by asking the audience, “How many of you love chocolate?” Many raise their hands in amusement.  “How many of you would consider yourself a chocoholic — you gotta have it?” he asked playfully as people raised their hands with a smirk.  “How many of you would steal from a convenience store for chocolate?” Silence.  “How many of you would leave your toddlers alone in the house while you went out to find chocolate?” “Would you would go to prison for chocolate?”          

 

 

 

 

 

 …

Read more

I’m Lovin’ It. From The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

This is great information that so many parents crave as they fear what will happen when their child returns home and ask, “What should we do?” Thank you, Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

6 Things to Do Before Your Kid Comes Home from Addiction Treatment

welcome home from treatment

The day has finally come for you and your family to welcome your son or daughter back from a residential treatment program (rehab) for addiction to drugs or alcohol. You may be cautiously optimistic for the homecoming or you may be worried about how it will go. You may not feel ready for your child to come home yet, remembering that feeling of walking on eggshells when he or she was home last, struggling with their substance use. These feelings are completely normal and you may even be experiencing them simultaneously.

You and your child

Read more