The Power of So What

scared babyBush and I were sitting at our kitchen table with the windows open. Next door a tradesman was pouring a concrete driveway for our neighbors.  His kids were with him, playing with a hose around the corner of the house.  You know what happened — water spewed on the wet cement when the kids accidentally diverted it. That didn’t sit well with their dad — at all. …

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It’s a Wonderful Life but it’s a Lot.

I struggle with people’s occasional (?) weirdness. Weirdness defined as not thinking the way I think, which is of course the right and only way.  I feel hurt, confused and “What?” “Oh,” “Okay,” and “WhatEVER” about it. Makes me not want  to be vulnerable and offer my something to be rejected. Makes me want to sit in my house in a butt-pocketed, well-worn La-Z-Boy with the same exact routine which does not involve getting involved. Makes me not want to give back, give out, give away. Makes me want to give up.

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Looks Bad on Paper

Years ago, about ten rows back in the auditorium a tearful mom talked to me after a school presentation on the dangers of alcohol and other drugs. “I don’t do anything that matters,” she said. “I’m so consumed with my son’s drug problem.” I could relate to the moon and back having felt that way to be sure. It gave new perspective to hear her say it out loud. What she does matters — she loves someone.

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She let go.

I heard it was good, so upon request my friend, Carol, sent to me a talk she gave at a group event. I think I’ve shared this piece on letting go but some things need to be our home screen and for me, this is one of them.

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Every Parent’s Post-Treatment Dream – A Plan! Partnership for Drug-Free Kids nails it.

Making a plan upon his return home for the summer was so helpful. Everyone knows what’s expected and agrees. Parents breathe easier. Thank you Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Grrrrrreat info.

How to Make a Recovery Plan With Your Son or Daughter After Treatment

How to Create a Recovery Plan

If your teen is coming home from residential treatment for a drug or alcohol addiction, it’s a good idea for you and your family to create a recovery plan.

A recovery plan is a way to map out what you all want as a family going forward, building on the great progress your son or daughter has made during treatment. It’s a tool to determine what actions will best support his or her recovery and personal growth, while enhancing your family’s overall well-being.

A recovery plan is developed together with your child and contains both rewards

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